The Florida College Resource Guide – Table Of Contents

Click the table of contents to view excerpts and
information from, and about, the chapters in the book.

 

  1. 11 Steps for College Success
  2. It’s never too late to go back
  3. Organization
  4. Understanding Financial-Aid
  5. Tests Required of Applicants
  6. Financial Aid Resource Guide
  7. Where to go for State and Federal Help
  8. Accreditation and Accrediting Agencies
  9. Florida State Universities
  10. Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida
  11. Florida Independent Colleges and Universities
  12. Florida Community Colleges
  13. Public Technical, Vocational and Trade Schools
  14. Non-Public Technical, Vocational and Trade Schools
  15. Using the Federal School List
  16. Florida Federal School Codes
  17. Florida Office of Labor Market Statistics
  18. Florida Employment Projections
  19. Valuable Internet Resources

Chapter 1
11 Steps for College Success

The basic steps are outlined below. The book delves into each of these subjects completely and contains invaluable information.

  1. It is never too early to start thinking about college.
  2. Study! Study! Study!
  3. Take some freshman-level courses in middle school.
  4. Pursue hobbies and non-academic interests.
  5. Think about your goals.
  6. Start planning for the cost of college.
  7. Explore all your alternatives.
  8. Explore different colleges.
  9. College shopping made easy.
  10. Attend college nights.
  11. Prepare yourself for college applications.

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Chapter 2
It’s never too late to go back

Are you a non-traditional student? In order to answer that question, let’s define the traditional students. Traditional students graduate from high school, usually between the ages of sixteen and eighteen, become college freshmen the same year and continue their education until acquiring their bachelor’s degree. A non-traditional student might be a student who attended college for a certain time but did not obtain a bachelor’s degree or someone who went out into the work force after high school and skipped college altogether. High school dropouts are also considered non-traditional and must take a required test to receive a general education development diploma before applying for college.

Like a traditional student, a non-traditional student must still apply for college, compile a resume, write application essays, obtain recommendation letters, and even look for financial aid. It’s just done a little different.

This chapter is full of useful tips and information for enrollment of the non-traditional student.

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Chapter 3
Organization

This chapter deals with the one part of college enrollment that many of us find the most difficult. Getting and staying organized. There are many deadlines in applying for different scholarships, so organization is a must.

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Chapter 4
Understanding Financial-Aid

There is currently 28 billion dollars available in the form of grants, loans, scholarships and federal government funds. Sounds good, but students and parents may have to contribute financially to a student’s education. Read this chapter to learn how to make the most out of the funds that may be available to you.

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Chapter 5
Tests Required of Applicants

Many graduate schools require that applicants submit scores on one or more standardized tests, often the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Professional schools usually require that applicants take a specific admission test, such as the Dental Admission Test (DAT), the Graduate Management Admission Test (OAT), the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT), or the Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT). Many graduate schools of education ask applicants to take the Praxis Series tests. Virtually all graduate and professional schools ask students whose native language is not English to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), and some also ask for TOEFL Test of Written English (TWE) or the Test of Spoken English (TSE).

Brief descriptions of these tests and the addresses to write to for additional information are outlined in the book.

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Chapter 6
Financial Aid Resource Guide

This chapter is dedicated to pointing out the various financial aid resources that are available, links to apply for student loans online and a list of the various government loans available. Also listed are the phone numbers and websites of banks that offer private student loans, along with useful information and links that may help you attain undergraduate schloarships and graduate fellowships.

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Chapter 7
Where to go for State and Federal Help

A listing of the agencies in all states (except S. Carolina) that are responsible for, or have information about receiving federal and state help. Includes address, phone numbers and phone numbers for all agencies. Also includes website address where available.

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Chapter 8
Accreditation and Accrediting Agencies

Colleges and Universities in the United States, and their individual academic and professional programs are accredited by non-governmental agencies concerned with the monitoring the quality of education in this country. Agencies with both regional and national jurisdictions grant accreditation to the institutions as a whole, while specialized bodies acting on a nationwide basis (often national professional associations) grant accreditation to departments and programs in specific fields.

This chapter explains in detail, accreditation, and contains 19 full pages of the names and addresses of all agencies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

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Chapter 9
Florida State Universities

A comprehensive list of Florida’s publicly funded four-year institutions. Addresses, phone numbers and website addresses are listed.

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Chapter 10
Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida

Members of ICUF; an association based in Tallahassee that promotes private, non-profit four-year college education programs. Addresses, phone numbers and website addresses are listed.

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Chapter 11
Florida Independent Colleges and Universities

Private two or four-year colleges licensed by the State Board of Independent Colleges and Universities. Addresses, phone numbers and website addresses are listed.

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Chapter 12
Florida Community Colleges

Publicly funded two-year institutions. Addresses, phone numbers and website addresses are listed.

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Chapter 13
Public Technical, Vocational and Trade Schools

Schools administered by district school boards, generally with one or two-year programs. Addresses, phone numbers and website addresses are listed.

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Chapter 14
Non-Public Technical, Vocational and Trade Schools

Private schools licensed by the Florida State Board of Non-Public Career Education and accredited. Addresses, phone numbers and website addresses are listed.

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Chapter 15
Using the Federal School List

General information on using the Federal School List. The complete 2002 Federal School List list along with official Federal School Codes is contained in the following chapter.

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Chapter 16
Florida Federal School Codes

The 2002 Federal School List contained in our book is intended as a resource for anyone who is completing a Free Application for Student Aid (FAFSA), Renewal FAFSA, FAFSA Express, FAFSA on the web or Renewal FAFSA on the Web application. When Answering FAFSA college name and address questions, applicants should use the official Federal School Code and name found in this list to ensure fast and accurate processing.

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Chapter 17
Florida Office of Labor Market Statistics

Compiled by The Florida Department of Labor and Employment Security, this list contains approximately 200 of the most in-demand jobs in the Florida job market, along with recent entry level wages, mean wages and annual openings in each field. Many people find themselves spending years in college, only to graduate into a field with little or no market or less than sufficient wages. This guide may help you choose the right field if you are undecided.

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Chapter 18
Florida Employment Projections

This chapter represents Table 4, Occupations with the largest job growth, 2000-2010, in “Occupational employment projections to 2010,” published in the November 2001 Monthly Labor Review.

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Chapter 19
Valuable Internet Resources

As a bonus for visiting our site, we list the online resources from our book in our Purchase The Guide page. Best of luck in your college enrollment journey. We hope we’ve made your job a little easier.

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